Posted On: May 21, 2012 by Ronald V. Miller, Jr.

Maryland Appellate Opinions Today

Four new Maryland appellate opinions today. None relate to personal injury claims, but I glanced at all four and figured I would make a blog post out of it.

  • Attorney Grievance Commission v. Butler: A 60-day suspension is in order if a lawyer shows up for trial without a good reason and without adequate communication with his client. In this case, the client got hit with a default judgment. To make matters worse, the lawyer did not tell the client, "Hey, you have a potential, ah, legal malpractice claim against me." Judges Harrell and Battaglia argued in the dissent that the suspension should be longer. I'm inclined to agree with the dissent.
  • McNeil v. State: This was actually the subject of my moot court project during my first year of law school. I even remember my fictionial client's name: Darryl Dare. Anyway, the question is whether jury verdicts in a criminal case can be factually inconsistent or illogical. The answer: they can. Juries don't have to make sense because the verdict may be a compromise, but judges do. This has always been the law of Maryland, but the Court of Appeals muddied the waters a little bit four years ago in Price v. State.
  • Maryland State Board of Elections v. Libertarian Party of Maryland: The Green Party and the Libertarian Party join forces to fight the Maryland State Board of Elections. That's all I know.
  • McCloud v. Handgun Permit Rev. Bd: If you commit a crime somewhere else, and it sounds like a crime that would ban you from getting a handgun for here in Maryland, you can't have the gun.